General Photo Tips | The Essential Composition Techniques in Digital Photography

General Photo Tips | The Essential Composition Techniques...

General Photo Tips | Before you just stand up and take a photo you should consider what you want your viewers to look at and how you will display main points of interest. You need to ask yourself, what is the main subject? At what angles do you want the light to fall under? Is there anything that could emphasize the main subject? In photography, it’s not just what you shoot that counts – the way that you shoot it is essential, too. Proper composition is a very important element of good photographs yet is something that is difficult to define. Bad photo composition can make a fantastic subject dull, but a well-set scene can create a beautiful photo from the most ordinary of situations.

A well-composed photograph is really a matter of opinion, but there are a few methods that tend to result in better pictures if used correctly. These techniques will help you take more compelling photographs, lending them a natural balance, drawing attention to the important parts of your photograph, or leading the viewer’s eye through the image.

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Symmetry | General Photo Tips

Symmetry in photography is creating an image which can be divided in two (either horizontally or vertically) equal segments where both the segments of the image look same or similar. Either of the parts can be a mirror image of each other. Symmetry has been used in other visual mediums since way back. Symmetry brings the feeling of unanimity and harmony. Depending upon the scene – symmetry can be something to go for – or to avoid at all costs. A symmetrical shot with strong composition and a good point of interest can lead to a striking image – but without the strong point of interest it can be predictable.

General Photo Tips | The Essential Composition Techniques...

Depth of Field | General Photo Tips

Depth of field is the amount of distance between the nearest and farthest objects that appear in acceptably sharp focus in a photo. A preferred amount of depth of field in a focused subject in an image can be quite subjective. Remember this, certain selection of DOF for one situation; application may be unacceptable for another photographer. It can isolate a subject from its background and foreground (when using a shallow depth of field) or it can put the same subject in context by uncovering it’s surrounding with a larger depth of field. Some photographs look soft intentionally. Usually, this is due to post processing and not using depth of field. There is a post processing technique called the Orton Effect (popularized by Photographer Michael Orton) where an overall glow is applied to a photograph.

Lines | General Photo Tips

A very powerful way of improving the composition of photos is the use of lines. Properly used, lines can dramatically increase the impact of images. Lines are all around us. Conscious use of line can add depth or dynamics to your composition. The simplest way to find a leading line is on a road. Roadways are inherently leading because they go into a certain direction, give us a feeling of motion, and the lines often point so far inwards that they reach a vanishing point – the place where two or more lines converge into theoretical infinity.

General Photo Tips | The Essential Composition Techniques...

General Photo Tips | Website Design – www.medianovak.com

Texture | General Photo Tips

Surface textures become most noticeable when they are illuminated from an oblique light source. Angled light captures the shape and imperfections of an object’s surface and creates a pattern of highlight and shadow to produce visual texture. The quality of the light is also crucial. Texture can be utilized as one of the main parts of creating drama in a photograph. Texture is fairly easy to capture and we may not even think of it because texture is found in virtually everything.

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